Publications

Title / Authors / Details Open Access Download

BioPAN: a web-based tool to explore mammalian lipidome metabolic pathways on LIPID MAPS.
Gaud C, C Sousa B, Nguyen A, Fedorova M, Ni Z, O'Donnell VB, Wakelam MJO, Andrews S, Lopez-Clavijo AF

Lipidomics increasingly describes the quantification using mass spectrometry of all lipids present in a biological sample.  As the power of lipidomics protocols increase, thousands of lipid molecular species from multiple categories can now be profiled in a single experiment.  Observed changes due to biological differences often encompass large numbers of structurally-related lipids, with these being regulated by enzymes from well-known metabolic pathways.  As lipidomics datasets increase in complexity, the interpretation of their results becomes more challenging.  BioPAN addresses this by enabling the researcher to visualise quantitative lipidomics data in the context of known biosynthetic pathways.  BioPAN provides a list of genes, which could be involved in the activation or suppression of enzymes catalysing lipid metabolism in mammalian tissues.

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F1000Research, 10, 1, , 2021

PMID:33564392

Open Access

Potential Role of Oral Rinses Targeting the Viral Lipid Envelope in SARS-CoV-2 Infection.
O'Donnell VB, Thomas D, Stanton R, Maillard JY, Murphy RC, Jones SA, Humphreys I, Wakelam MJO, Fegan C, Wise MP, Bosch A, Sattar SA

Emerging studies increasingly demonstrate the importance of the throat and salivary glands as sites of virus replication and transmission in early COVID-19 disease. SARS-CoV-2 is an enveloped virus, characterized by an outer lipid membrane derived from the host cell from which it buds. While it is highly sensitive to agents that disrupt lipid biomembranes, there has been no discussion about the potential role of oral rinsing in preventing transmission. Here, we review known mechanisms of viral lipid membrane disruption by widely available dental mouthwash components that include ethanol, chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and povidone-iodine. We also assess existing formulations for their potential ability to disrupt the SARS-CoV-2 lipid envelope, based on their concentrations of these agents, and conclude that several deserve clinical evaluation. We highlight that already published research on other enveloped viruses, including coronaviruses, directly supports the idea that oral rinsing should be considered as a potential way to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Research to test this could include evaluating existing or specifically tailored new formulations in well-designed viral inactivation assays, then in clinical trials. Population-based interventions could be undertaken with available mouthwashes, with active monitoring of outcome to determine efficacy. This is an under-researched area of major clinical need.

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Function (Oxford, England), 1, 1, , 2020

PMID:33215159

Open Access

Steps Towards Minimal Reporting Standards for Lipidomics Mass Spectrometry in Biomedical Research Publications.
O'Donnell VB, FitzGerald GA, Murphy RC, Liebisch G, Dennis EA, Quehenberger O, Subramaniam S, Wakelam MJO

None listed

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Circulation. Genomic and precision medicine, 1, 1, , 16 Nov 2020

PMID:33196315

Update on LIPID MAPS Classification, Nomenclature and Shorthand Notation for MS-derived Lipid Structures.
Liebisch G, Fahy E, Aoki J, Dennis EA, Durand T, Ejsing C, Fedorova M, Feussner I, Griffiths WJ, Koefeler H, Merrill AH, Murphy RC, O'Donnell VB, Oskolkova OV, Subramaniam S, Wakelam M, Spener F

A comprehensive and standardized system to report lipid structures analyzed by mass spectrometry is essential for the communication and storage of lipidomics data. Herein, an update on both the LIPID MAPS classification system and shorthand notation of lipid structures is presented for lipid categories Fatty Acyls (FA), Glycerolipids (GL), Glycerophospholipids (GP), Sphingolipids (SP), and Sterols (ST). With its major changes, i.e. annotation of ring double bond equivalents and number of oxygens, the updated shorthand notation facilitates reporting of newly delineated oxygenated lipid species as well. For standardized reporting in lipidomics, the hierarchical architecture of shorthand notation reflects the diverse structural resolution powers provided by mass spectrometric assays. Moreover, shorthand notation is expanded beyond mammalian phyla to lipids from plant and yeast phyla. Finally, annotation of atoms is included for the use of stable isotope-labelled compounds in metabolic labelling experiments or as internal standards.This update on lipid classification, nomenclature and shorthand annotation for lipid mass spectra is considered a standard for lipid data presentation.

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Journal of lipid research, 1, 1, , 09 Oct 2020

PMID:33037133

Open Access

LipidFinder 2.0: advanced informatics pipeline for lipidomics discovery applications.
Alvarez-Jarreta J, Rodrigues PRS, Fahy E, O'Connor A, Price A, Gaud C, Andrews S, Benton P, Siuzdak G, Hawksworth JI, Valdivia-Garcia M, Allen SM, O'Donnell VB

We present LipidFinder 2.0, incorporating four new modules that apply artefact filters, remove lipid and contaminant stacks, in-source fragments and salt clusters, and a new isotope deletion method which is significantly more sensitive than available open-access alternatives. We also incorporate a novel false discovery rate (FDR) method, utilizing a target-decoy strategy, which allows users to assess data quality. A renewed lipid profiling method is introduced which searches three different databases from LIPID MAPS and returns bulk lipid structures only, and a lipid category scatter plot with color blind friendly pallet. An API interface with XCMS Online is made available on LipidFinder's online version. We show using real data that LipidFinder 2.0 provides a significant improvement over non-lipid metabolite filtering and lipid profiling, compared to available tools.

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Bioinformatics (Oxford, England), 1, 1, , 07 Oct 2020

PMID:33027502

Tissue-resident macrophages actively suppress IL-1beta release via a reactive prostanoid/IL-10 pathway.
Ipseiz N, Pickering RJ, Rosas M, Tyrrell VJ, Davies LC, Orr SJ, Czubala MA, Fathalla D, Robertson AA, Bryant CE, O'Donnell V, Taylor PR

The alarm cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a potent activator of the inflammatory cascade following pathogen recognition. IL-1β production typically requires two signals: first, priming by recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns leads to the production of immature pro-IL-1β; subsequently, inflammasome activation by a secondary signal allows cleavage and maturation of IL-1β from its pro-form. However, despite the important role of IL-1β in controlling local and systemic inflammation, its overall regulation is still not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that peritoneal tissue-resident macrophages use an active inhibitory pathway, to suppress IL-1β processing, which can otherwise occur in the absence of a second signal. Programming by the transcription factor Gata6 controls the expression of prostacyclin synthase, which is required for prostacyclin production after lipopolysaccharide stimulation and optimal induction of IL-10. In the absence of secondary signal, IL-10 potently inhibits IL-1β processing, providing a previously unrecognized control of IL-1β in tissue-resident macrophages.

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The EMBO journal, 39, 14, , 15 Jul 2020

PMID:32484988

Open Access

Metabolic Dysregulation of the Lysophospholipid/Autotaxin Axis in the Chromosome 9p21 Gene SNP rs10757274.
Meckelmann SW, Hawksworth JI, White D, Andrews R, Rodrigues P, O'Connor A, Alvarez-Jarreta J, Tyrrell VJ, Hinz C, Zhou Y, Williams J, Aldrovandi M, Watkins WJ, Engler AJ, Lo Sardo V, Slatter DA, Allen SM, Acharya J, Mitchell J, Cooper J, Aoki J, Kano K, Humphries SE, O'Donnell VB

Common chromosome 9p21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) increase coronary heart disease risk, independent of traditional lipid risk factors. However, lipids comprise large numbers of structurally related molecules not measured in traditional risk measurements, and many have inflammatory bioactivities. Here, we applied lipidomic and genomic approaches to 3 model systems to characterize lipid metabolic changes in common Chr9p21 SNPs, which confer ≈30% elevated coronary heart disease risk associated with altered expression of ANRIL, a long ncRNA.

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Circulation. Genomic and precision medicine, 13, 3, , 06 2020

PMID:32396387

Open Access

Lipidomics: Current state of the art in a fast moving field.
O'Donnell VB, Ekroos K, Liebisch G, Wakelam M

Lipids are essential for all facets of life. They play three major roles: energy metabolism, structural, and signaling. They are dynamic molecules strongly influenced by endogenous and exogenous factors including genetics, diet, age, lifestyle, drugs, disease and inflammation. As precision medicine starts to become mainstream, there is a huge burgeoning interest in lipids and their potential to act as unique biomarkers or prognostic indicators. Lipids comprise a large component of all metabolites (around one-third), and our expanding knowledge about their dynamic behavior is fueling the hope that mapping their regulatory biochemical pathways on a systems level will revolutionize our ability to prevent, diagnose, and stratify major human diseases. Up to now, clinical lipid measurements have consisted primarily of total cholesterol or triglycerides, as a measure for cardiovascular risk and response to lipid lowering drugs. Nowadays, we are able to measure thousands of individual lipids that make up the lipidome. nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) metabolomics is also being increasingly used in large cohort studies where it can report on total levels of selected lipid classes, and relative levels of fatty acid saturation. To support the application of lipidomics research, LIPID MAPS was established in 2003, and since then has gone on to become the go-to resource for several lipid databases, lipid drawing tools, data deposition, and more recently lipidomics informatics tools, and a lipid biochemistry encyclopedia, LipidWeb. Alongside this, the recently established Lipidomics Standards Initiative plays a key role in standardization of lipidomics methodologies. This article is categorized under: Laboratory Methods and Technologies > Metabolomics Analytical and Computational Methods > Analytical Methods.

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Wiley interdisciplinary reviews. Systems biology and medicine, , 1939-005X, , 2019

PMID:31646749

FSP1 is a glutathione-independent ferroptosis suppressor.
Doll S, Freitas FP, Shah R, Aldrovandi M, da Silva MC, Ingold I, Goya Grocin A, Xavier da Silva TN, Panzilius E, Scheel CH, Mourão A, Buday K, Sato M, Wanninger J, Vignane T, Mohana V, Rehberg M, Flatley A, Schepers A, Kurz A, White D, Sauer M, Sattler M, Tate EW, Schmitz W, Schulze A, O'Donnell V, Proneth B, Popowicz GM, Pratt DA, Angeli JPF, Conrad M

Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of necrotic cell death marked by oxidative damage to phospholipids. To date, ferroptosis has been thought to be controlled only by the phospholipid hydroperoxide-reducing enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) and radical-trapping antioxidants. However, elucidation of the factors that underlie the sensitivity of a given cell type to ferroptosis is crucial to understand the pathophysiological role of ferroptosis and how it may be exploited for the treatment of cancer. Although metabolic constraints and phospholipid composition contribute to ferroptosis sensitivity, no cell-autonomous mechanisms have been identified that account for the resistance of cells to ferroptosis. Here we used an expression cloning approach to identify genes in human cancer cells that are able to complement the loss of GPX4. We found that the flavoprotein apoptosis-inducing factor mitochondria-associated 2 (AIFM2) is a previously unrecognized anti-ferroptotic gene. AIFM2, which we renamed ferroptosis suppressor protein 1 (FSP1) and which was initially described as a pro-apoptotic gene, confers protection against ferroptosis elicited by GPX4 deletion. We further demonstrate that the suppression of ferroptosis by FSP1 is mediated by ubiquinone (also known as coenzyme Q, CoQ): the reduced form, ubiquinol, traps lipid peroxyl radicals that mediate lipid peroxidation, whereas FSP1 catalyses the regeneration of CoQ using NAD(P)H. Pharmacological targeting of FSP1 strongly synergizes with GPX4 inhibitors to trigger ferroptosis in a number of cancer entities. In conclusion, the FSP1-CoQ-NAD(P)H pathway exists as a stand-alone parallel system, which co-operates with GPX4 and glutathione to suppress phospholipid peroxidation and ferroptosis.

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Nature, 575, 7784, , 11 2019

PMID:31634899
DOI: 10.1038/s41586-019-1707-0

Revising the structure of a new eicosanoid from human platelets to 8,9-11,12-diepoxy-13-hydroxyeicosadienoic acid.
Kornilov A, Kennedy PD, Aldrovandi M, Watson AJA, Hinz C, Harless B, Colombo J, Maxey KM, Tyrrell VJ, Simon M, Aggarwal VK, Boeglin WE, Brash AR, Murphy RC, O'Donnell VB

Eicosanoids are critical mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation generated by immune and tissue cells. We recently described a new bioactive eicosanoid generated by cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) turnover during platelet activation that can stimulate human neutrophil integrin expression. On the basis of mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS), stable isotope labeling, and GC-MS analysis, we previously proposed a structure of 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (DXA). Here, we achieved enzymatic synthesis and H NMR characterization of this compound with results in conflict with the previously proposed structural assignment. Accordingly, by using LC-MS, we screened autoxidation reactions of 11-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (11-HpETE) and thereby identified a candidate sharing the precise reverse-phase chromatographic and MS characteristics of the platelet product. We optimized these methods to increase yield, allowing full structural analysis by H NMR. The revised assignment is presented here as 8,9-11,12-diepoxy-13-hydroxyeicosadienoic acid, abbreviated to 8,9-11,12-DiEp-13-HEDE or DiEpHEDE, substituted for the previous name DXA We found that in platelets, the lipid likely forms via dioxolane ring opening with rearrangement to the diepoxy moieties followed by oxygen insertion at C13. We present its enzymatic biosynthetic pathway and MS/MS fragmentation pattern and, using the synthetic compound, demonstrate that it has bioactivity. For the platelet lipid, we estimate 16 isomers based on our current knowledge (and four isomers for the synthetic lipid). Determining the exact isomeric structure of the platelet lipid remains to be undertaken.

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The Journal of biological chemistry, 294, 23, , 07 06 2019

PMID:31061099

Open Access

Phospholipid membranes drive abdominal aortic aneurysm development through stimulating coagulation factor activity.
Allen-Redpath K, Aldrovandi M, Lauder SN, Gketsopoulou A, Tyrrell VJ, Slatter DA, Andrews R, Watkins WJ, Atkinson G, McNeill E, Gilfedder A, Protty M, Burston J, Johnson SRC, Rodrigues PRS, Jones DO, Lee R, Handa A, Channon K, Obaji S, Alvarez-Jarreta J, Krönke G, Ackermann J, Jenkins PV, Collins PW, O'Donnell VB

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory vascular disease with high mortality and limited treatment options. How blood lipids regulate AAA development is unknown. Here lipidomics and genetic models demonstrate a central role for procoagulant enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPL) in regulating AAA. Specifically, through activating coagulation, eoxPL either promoted or inhibited AAA depending on tissue localization. Ang II administration to mice increased intravascular coagulation during AAA development. Lipidomics revealed large numbers of eoxPL formed within mouse and human AAA lesions. Deletion of eoxPL-generating enzymes ( or ) or administration of the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban significantly reduced AAA. -deficient mice displayed constitutively dysregulated hemostasis, including a consumptive coagulopathy, characterized by compensatory increase in prothrombotic aminophospholipids (aPL) in circulating cell membranes. Intravenously administered procoagulant PL caused clotting factor activation and depletion, induced a bleeding defect, and significantly reduced AAA development. These data suggest that deletion reduces AAA through diverting coagulation away from the vessel wall due to eoxPL deficiency, instead activating clotting factor consumption and depletion in the circulation. In mouse whole blood, ∼44 eoxPL molecular species formed within minutes of clot initiation. These were significantly elevated with deletion, and many were absent in mice, identifying specific eoxPL that modulate AAA. Correlation networks demonstrated eoxPL belonged to subfamilies defined by oxylipin composition. Thus, procoagulant PL regulate AAA development through complex interactions with clotting factors. Modulation of the delicate balance between bleeding and thrombosis within either the vessel wall or circulation was revealed that can either drive or prevent disease development.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 116, 16, , 16 04 2019

PMID:30944221

Open Access

15-keto-prostaglandin E2 activates host peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) to promote Cryptococcus neoformans growth during infection.
Evans RJ, Pline K, Loynes CA, Needs S, Aldrovandi M, Tiefenbach J, Bielska E, Rubino RE, Nicol CJ, May RC, Krause HM, O'Donnell VB, Renshaw SA, Johnston SA

Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the leading causes of invasive fungal infection in humans worldwide. C. neoformans uses macrophages as a proliferative niche to increase infective burden and avoid immune surveillance. However, the specific mechanisms by which C. neoformans manipulates host immunity to promote its growth during infection remain ill-defined. Here we demonstrate that eicosanoid lipid mediators manipulated and/or produced by C. neoformans play a key role in regulating pathogenesis. C. neoformans is known to secrete several eicosanoids that are highly similar to those found in vertebrate hosts. Using eicosanoid deficient cryptococcal mutants Δplb1 and Δlac1, we demonstrate that prostaglandin E2 is required by C. neoformans for proliferation within macrophages and in vivo during infection. Genetic and pharmacological disruption of host PGE2 synthesis is not required for promotion of cryptococcal growth by eicosanoid production. We find that PGE2 must be dehydrogenated into 15-keto-PGE2 to promote fungal growth, a finding that implicated the host nuclear receptor PPAR-γ. C. neoformans infection of macrophages activates host PPAR-γ and its inhibition is sufficient to abrogate the effect of 15-keto-PGE2 in promoting fungal growth during infection. Thus, we describe the first mechanism of reliance on pathogen-derived eicosanoids in fungal pathogenesis and the specific role of 15-keto-PGE2 and host PPAR-γ in cryptococcosis.

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PLoS pathogens, 15, 3, , 03 2019

PMID:30921435

Open Access

LIPID MAPS: Serving the next generation of lipid researchers with tools, resources, data, and training.
O'Donnell VB, Dennis EA, Wakelam MJO, Subramaniam S

Lipids are increasingly recognized as dynamic, critical metabolites affecting human physiology and pathophysiology. LIPID MAPS is a free resource dedicated to serving the lipid research community.

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Science signaling, 12, 1937-9145, , 2019

PMID:30622195

Open Access

LipidFinder on LIPID MAPS: peak filtering, MS searching and statistical analysis for lipidomics.
Fahy E, Alvarez-Jarreta J, Brasher CJ, Nguyen A, Hawksworth JI, Rodrigues P, Meckelmann S, Allen SM, O'Donnell VB

We present LipidFinder online, hosted on the LIPID MAPS website, as a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) workflow comprising peak filtering, MS searching and statistical analysis components, highly customized for interrogating lipidomic data. The online interface of LipidFinder includes several innovations such as comprehensive parameter tuning, a MS search engine employing in-house customized, curated and computationally generated databases and multiple reporting/display options. A set of integrated statistical analysis tools which enable users to identify those features which are significantly-altered under the selected experimental conditions, thereby greatly reducing the complexity of the peaklist prior to MS searching is included. LipidFinder is presented as a highly flexible, extensible user-friendly online workflow which leverages the lipidomics knowledge base and resources of the LIPID MAPS website, long recognized as a leading global lipidomics portal.

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Bioinformatics (Oxford, England), 35, 1367-4811, , 2019

PMID:30101336

Open Access

Phospholipid signaling in innate immune cells.
O'Donnell VB, Rossjohn J, Wakelam MJ

Phospholipids comprise a large body of lipids that define cells and organelles by forming membrane structures. Importantly, their complex metabolism represents a highly controlled cellular signaling network that is essential for mounting an effective innate immune response. Phospholipids in innate cells are subject to dynamic regulation by enzymes, whose activities are highly responsive to activation status. Along with their metabolic products, they regulate multiple aspects of innate immune cell biology, including shape change, aggregation, blood clotting, and degranulation. Phospholipid hydrolysis provides substrates for cell-cell communication, enables regulation of hemostasis, immunity, thrombosis, and vascular inflammation, and is centrally important in cardiovascular disease and associated comorbidities. Phospholipids themselves are also recognized by innate-like T cells, which are considered essential for recognition of infection or cancer, as well as self-antigens. This Review describes the major phospholipid metabolic pathways present in innate immune cells and summarizes the formation and metabolism of phospholipids as well as their emerging roles in cell biology and disease.

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The Journal of clinical investigation, 1, 1558-8238, , 2018

PMID:29683435

Open Access

Enzymatically oxidized phospholipids restore thrombin generation in coagulation factor deficiencies.
Slatter DA, Percy CL, Allen-Redpath K, Gajsiewicz JM, Brooks NJ, Clayton A, Tyrrell VJ, Rosas M, Lauder SN, Watson A, Dul M, Garcia-Diaz Y, Aldrovandi M, Heurich M, Hall J, Morrissey JH, Lacroix-Desmazes S, Delignat S, Jenkins PV, Collins PW, O'Donnell VB

Hemostatic defects are treated using coagulation factors; however, clot formation also requires a procoagulant phospholipid (PL) surface. Here, we show that innate immune cell-derived enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPL) termed hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phospholipids (HETE-PLs) restore hemostasis in human and murine conditions of pathological bleeding. HETE-PLs abolished blood loss in murine hemophilia A and enhanced coagulation in factor VIII- (FVIII-), FIX-, and FX-deficient human plasma . HETE-PLs were decreased in platelets from patients after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). To explore molecular mechanisms, the ability of eoxPL to stimulate individual isolated coagulation factor/cofactor complexes was tested in vitro. Extrinsic tenase (FVIIa/tissue factor [TF]), intrinsic tenase (FVIIIa/FIXa), and prothrombinase (FVa/FXa) all were enhanced by both HETE-PEs and HETE-PCs, suggesting a common mechanism involving the fatty acid moiety. In plasma, 9-, 15-, and 12-HETE-PLs were more effective than 5-, 11-, or 8-HETE-PLs, indicating positional isomer specificity. Coagulation was enhanced at lower lipid/factor ratios, consistent with a more concentrated area for protein binding. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed binding of FII and FX to HETE-PEs. HETE-PEs increased membrane curvature and thickness, but not surface charge or homogeneity, possibly suggesting increased accessibility to cations/factors. In summary, innate immune-derived eoxPL enhance calcium-dependent coagulation factor function, and their potential utility in bleeding disorders is proposed.

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JCI insight, 3, 6, , 22 03 2018

PMID:29563336

Open Access

Networks of enzymatically oxidized membrane lipids support calcium-dependent coagulation factor binding to maintain hemostasis.
Lauder SN, Allen-Redpath K, Slatter DA, Aldrovandi M, O'Connor A, Farewell D, Percy CL, Molhoek JE, Rannikko S, Tyrrell VJ, Ferla S, Milne GL, Poole AW, Thomas CP, Obaji S, Taylor PR, Jones SA, de Groot PG, Urbanus RT, Hörkkö S, Uderhardt S, Ackermann J, Vince Jenkins P, Brancale A, Krönke G, Collins PW, O'Donnell VB

Blood coagulation functions as part of the innate immune system by preventing bacterial invasion, and it is critical to stopping blood loss (hemostasis). Coagulation involves the external membrane surface of activated platelets and leukocytes. Using lipidomic, genetic, biochemical, and mathematical modeling approaches, we found that enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPLs) generated by the activity of leukocyte or platelet lipoxygenases (LOXs) were required for normal hemostasis and promoted coagulation factor activities in a Ca- and phosphatidylserine (PS)-dependent manner. In wild-type mice, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phospholipids (HETE-PLs) enhanced coagulation and restored normal hemostasis in clotting-deficient animals genetically lacking p12-LOX or 12/15-LOX activity. Murine platelets generated 22 eoxPL species, all of which were missing in the absence of p12-LOX. Humans with the thrombotic disorder antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) had statistically significantly increased HETE-PLs in platelets and leukocytes, as well as greater HETE-PL immunoreactivity, than healthy controls. HETE-PLs enhanced membrane binding of the serum protein β2GP1 (β2-glycoprotein 1), an event considered central to the autoimmune reactivity responsible for APS symptoms. Correlation network analysis of 47 platelet eoxPL species in platelets from APS and control subjects identified their enzymatic origin and revealed a complex network of regulation, with the abundance of 31 p12-LOX-derived eoxPL molecules substantially increased in APS. In summary, circulating blood cells generate networks of eoxPL molecules, including HETE-PLs, which change membrane properties to enhance blood coagulation and contribute to the excessive clotting and immunoreactivity of patients with APS.

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Science signaling, 10, 507, , 28 Nov 2017

PMID:29184033

Open Access

Metabolic reprogramming ensures cancer cell survival despite oncogenic signaling blockade.
Lue HW, Podolak J, Kolahi K, Cheng L, Rao S, Garg D, Xue CH, Rantala JK, Tyner JW, Thornburg KL, Martinez-Acevedo A, Liu JJ, Amling CL, Truillet C, Louie SM, Anderson KE, Evans MJ, O'Donnell VB, Nomura DK, Drake JM, Ritz A, Thomas GV

There is limited knowledge about the metabolic reprogramming induced by cancer therapies and how this contributes to therapeutic resistance. Here we show that although inhibition of PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling markedly decreased glycolysis and restrained tumor growth, these signaling and metabolic restrictions triggered autophagy, which supplied the metabolites required for the maintenance of mitochondrial respiration and redox homeostasis. Specifically, we found that survival of cancer cells was critically dependent on phospholipase A2 (PLA2) to mobilize lysophospholipids and free fatty acids to sustain fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. Consistent with this, we observed significantly increased lipid droplets, with subsequent mobilization to mitochondria. These changes were abrogated in cells deficient for the essential autophagy gene Accordingly, inhibition of PLA2 significantly decreased lipid droplets, decreased oxidative phosphorylation, and increased apoptosis. Together, these results describe how treatment-induced autophagy provides nutrients for cancer cell survival and identifies novel cotreatment strategies to override this survival advantage.

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Genes & development, 31, 20, , 15 10 2017

PMID:29138276

Open Access

Enzymatic lipid oxidation by eosinophils propagates coagulation, hemostasis, and thrombotic disease.
Uderhardt S, Ackermann JA, Fillep T, Hammond VJ, Willeit J, Santer P, Mayr M, Biburger M, Miller M, Zellner KR, Stark K, Zarbock A, Rossaint J, Schubert I, Mielenz D, Dietel B, Raaz-Schrauder D, Ay C, Gremmel T, Thaler J, Heim C, Herrmann M, Collins PW, Schabbauer G, Mackman N, Voehringer D, Nadler JL, Lee JJ, Massberg S, Rauh M, Kiechl S, Schett G, O'Donnell VB, Krönke G

Blood coagulation is essential for physiological hemostasis but simultaneously contributes to thrombotic disease. However, molecular and cellular events controlling initiation and propagation of coagulation are still incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate an unexpected role of eosinophils during plasmatic coagulation, hemostasis, and thrombosis. Using a large-scale epidemiological approach, we identified eosinophil cationic protein as an independent and predictive risk factor for thrombotic events in humans. Concurrent experiments showed that eosinophils contributed to intravascular thrombosis by exhibiting a strong endogenous thrombin-generation capacity that relied on the enzymatic generation and active provision of a procoagulant phospholipid surface enriched in 12/15-lipoxygenase-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phosphatidylethanolamines. Our findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of eosinophils and enzymatic lipid oxidation as regulatory elements that facilitate both hemostasis and thrombosis in response to vascular injury, thus identifying promising new targets for the treatment of thrombotic disease.

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The Journal of experimental medicine, 214, 7, , 03 Jul 2017

PMID:28566277

Open Access

Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (3rd edition).
Klionsky DJ, Ktistakis NT, O'Donnell VB, et al

n/a

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Autophagy, 12, 1554-8635, , 2016

PMID:26799652

Open Access