Life Sciences Research for Lifelong Health

Simon Cook

Simon became interested in Signal Transduction during his Biochemistry degree at Royal Holloway College, University of London. He did his PhD in Michael Wakelam’s laboratory at the University of Glasgow, studying signalling by Phospholipase-C and -D. A chance meeting over a beer (several beers actually) at a conference led to his move in 1991 to Post-Doc with Frank McCormick at ONYX Pharmaceuticals in the San Francisco Bay Area where he studied the then emerging RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK1/2 pathway. After his Post-Doc Simon stayed on at ONYX as a Staff Scientist, member of the RAS Group Steering Committee and Project Manager for the Inflammation Project. In 1997 he took a Group Leader post at the Babraham Institute. From 2000-2006 he held a CRUK Senior Cancer Research Fellowship and is currently a Group Leader in the Signalling Programme. He also coordinates Knowledge Exchange and Commercialisation activities within the Institute. His hobbies include birdwatching, walking, reading, music, cinema and undermining the system from within.

01223 496453

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Latest Publications

Control of cell death and mitochondrial fission by ERK1/2 MAP Kinase signalling.

Cook SJ, Stuart K, Gilley R

The FEBS journal
1742-4658: (2017)

PMID: 28548464

Visualisation of Endogenous ERK1/2 in Cells with a Bioorthogonal Covalent Probe.

Sipthorp J, Lebraud H, Gilley R

Bioconjugate chemistry
1520-4812: (2017)

PMID: 28449575

RNA-binding proteins ZFP36L1 and ZFP36L2 promote cell quiescence.

Galloway A, Saveliev A, Łukasiak S

Science (New York, N.Y.)
352 1095-9203:453-9 (2016)

PMID: 27102483

Tumor cells with KRAS or BRAF mutations or ERK5/MAPK7 amplification are not addicted to ERK5 activity for cell proliferation.

Lochhead PA, Clark J, Wang LZ

Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.)
15 1551-4005:506-18 (2016)

PMID: 26959608