Life Sciences Research for Lifelong Health

Publications

The Babraham Institute Publications database contains details of all publications resulting from our research groups and scientific services.

Individual publications are linked to the website of the journal - subscriptions may be required to view the full text. The database also includes Open Access publications, which can be identified by the icons found on search results.

Open Access symbolWe are working to provide Open Access to as many publications as possible.

'Green' Open Access publications are marked by the PDF icon. Click on the PDF icon, to access a pre-print PDF version of the publication.

​'Gold' Open Access publications have the gold open padlock icon. You can read the full version of these papers on the publishing journal’s website without a subscription.
 

Title / Authors / Details Open Access Download

Detection of interleukin 8 biological activity in synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and production of interleukin 8 mRNA by isolated synovial cells.
Brennan FM, Zachariae CO, Chantry D, Larsen CG, Turner M, Maini RN, Matsushima K, Feldmann M

The presence of neutrophils in the synovial joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is thought to be due to the activity of chemotactic factors released by activated cells in the joint. We have shown in this report, for the first time, the abundance of one such factor, interleukin 8 (IL 8), in the synovial fluid of patients both with RA and other non-RA joint diseases, and the spontaneous production of IL 8 mRNA by RA synovial cells in culture. There was no correlation between the levels of chemotactic activity and IL 8 protein, suggesting that other factors with similar neutrophil chemotactic activity are also present in the synovial fluid exudate. In support of this concept neither the level of chemotactic activity nor IL 8 protein levels correlated with neutrophil or leukocyte infiltration, indicating that the mechanism of migration into the inflammatory environment of the joint is complex. Such migration is likely to be due to a number of chemotactic signals in addition to IL 8, which may either synergize with, or inhibit, the action of IL 8.

+ View Abstract

European journal of immunology, 20, 0014-2980, 2141-4, 1990

PMID: 2209707


Open Access

Detection of transforming growth factor-beta in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue: lack of effect on spontaneous cytokine production in joint cell cultures.
Brennan FM, Chantry D, Turner M, Foxwell B, Maini R, Feldmann M

The presence of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in inflammatory joint disease was investigated. Synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and patients with other non-autoimmune inflammatory joint diseases contained high levels of both active and latent TGF-beta. Levels of active TGF-beta did not correlate with drug regimen in either patient group or with the recovery period in the individuals with non-RA joint disease. Freshly isolated synovial cells from individuals with RA were shown by Northern blotting to express the mRNA for TGF-beta 1 and to secrete latent TGF-beta protein which could be neutralized by antibodies to TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal donors produced interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) which was inhibited by pretreatment of these cells with recombinant TGF-beta. Cytokine production was not inhibited if the addition of TGF-beta was used after the inducing stimulus, suggesting that in activated cells cytokine production cannot be inhibited. This was confirmed by the observation that neither TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 2 inhibited spontaneous IL-1 or TNF-alpha production by rheumatoid synovial mononuclear cells in culture. These findings show that despite the presence of active TGF-beta in RA synovial joints and the spontaneous production of latent (potentially active) TGF-beta by RA cells in culture, additional TGF-beta did not inhibit ongoing cytokine synthesis in vitro. This suggests that TGF-beta may not inhibit cytokine production in the rheumatoid joint although it cannot be ruled out that in vivo TGF-beta already has an immunosuppressive effect which cannot be further increased in vitro by exogenous protein.

+ View Abstract

Clinical and experimental immunology, 81, 0009-9104, 278-85, 1990

PMID: 2201470


Open Access

A common structure for neutral polymers isolated from the lipopolysaccharides of reference strains for Serratia marcescens serogroups O17 and O19.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

Carbohydrate research, 198, 0008-6215, 168-72, 1990

PMID: 2191776


Cloning of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor cDNA and expression of recombinant soluble TNF-binding protein.
Gray PW, Barrett K, Chantry D, Turner M, Feldmann M

The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNF alpha with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extracellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNF alpha with an affinity of 2.5 x 10(-9) M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNF alpha or lymphotoxin (TNF beta).

+ View Abstract

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 87, 0027-8424, 7380-4, 1990

PMID: 2170974


Open Access

Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor induces both HLA-DR expression and cytokine production by human monocytes.
Chantry D, Turner M, Brennan F, Kingsbury A, Feldmann M

The effect of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the expression of HLA-DR, and the production of the cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) by human peripheral blood monocyte-enriched populations was investigated. GM-CSF was shown to induce both the expression of HLA-DR and the cytokines IL-1 and TNF alpha in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which induced major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression, did not induce IL-1 or TNF alpha production. However, IFN-gamma enhanced the cell surface expression of HLA-DR and the production of IL-1 and TNF alpha on monocyte-enriched cells stimulated by GM-CSF. By itself, GM-CSF did not induce surface class II expression on the human monocytic tumour cell line THP-1, whereas it synergized with IFN-gamma to induce surface expression. These cells responded to GM-CSF by producing IL-1 and TNF alpha; Northern blotting showed that mRNA levels of IL-1 and TNF alpha were transiently induced, similar to other cytokines. Our results indicate that GM-CSF is a major macrophage activating factor that is capable of inducing both the expression of HLA-DR and the cytokines involved in T-cell activation by macrophages; therefore, GM-CSF may be of importance in potentiating antigen presenting function.

+ View Abstract

Cytokine, 2, 1043-4666, 60-7, 1990

PMID: 2129500


Open Access

Transforming growth factor beta induces the production of interleukin 6 by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.
Turner M, Chantry D, Feldmann M

Previous studies have indicated that the cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) has immunosuppressive properties and can inhibit the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and Interleukin 1 (IL 1) by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In this study, we have examined the effects of TGF beta 1 on the production of Interleukin 6 (IL 6) by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Treatment with only TGF beta 1 leads to the induction of IL 6, and this was both dose- and time-dependent. The effect of TGF beta 1 was evident at the level of IL 6 mRNA, suggesting TGF beta 1-induced de novo synthesis of IL 6. Induction of IL 6 by TGF beta 1 was specific, as other cytokines made by mononuclear cells (TNF and IL 1) were not induced by TGF beta 1. Furthermore, when a panel of stimuli were compared for their ability to induce IL 1, TNF and IL 6 in the presence or absence of TGF beta 1, IL 6 levels were augmented in the presence of TGF beta 1, while the induction of IL 1 and TNF was inhibited significantly. These results indicate that TGF beta 1 has complex effects on the production of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells and that TGF beta 1 is not inhibitory for all cytokine production. The ability of TGF beta 1 to induce IL 6 suggests that IL 6 may mediate some of the effects of TGF beta 1.

+ View Abstract

Cytokine, 2, 1043-4666, 211-6, 1990

PMID: 2104224


Open Access

Interleukin 7 and interleukin 4 stimulate human thymocyte growth through distinct mechanisms.
Varma C, Chantry D, Brennan F, Turner M, Katz F, Feldmann M

One of the major functions of cytokines is their ability to regulate cell growth and differentiation. The complexity of this process has been highlighted by recent studies on murine thymocytes; it has been shown that a number of cytokines interact to regulate thymocyte growth. We have investigated the effects of interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interleukin 7 (IL-7) on human thymocyte proliferation. Although maximal proliferation was dependent upon the presence of the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), IL-7 alone stimulated thymocyte growth. In order to determine if this proliferation was due to the induction of IL-2, this pathway was inhibited by the addition of blocking antibody to the IL-2 receptor. Proliferation induced with IL-7 plus PHA, but not that induced by IL-7 alone, could be blocked by this treatment. In contrast, IL-4 stimulated thymocyte proliferation only in the presence of PHA; this proliferation was not inhibited by antibodies to the IL-2 receptor. Our findings show that both IL-7 and IL-4 can act as growth factors for human thymocytes, and that these cytokines stimulate proliferation through distinct mechanisms.

+ View Abstract

Cytokine, 2, 1043-4666, 55-9, 1990

PMID: 2104214


Open Access

Production of interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 by human keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.
Partridge M, Chantry D, Turner M, Feldmann M

Cultured human keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines were analyzed for the presence of ribonucleic acid (RNA) transcripts for the cytokines interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 and for these proteins. This study demonstrates that both cytokines are synthesized and secreted by both normal keratinocytes and SCC lines. The rate of secretion of these cytokines can be augmented in response to a variety of stimuli including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, transforming growth factor-beta and the combination of lipopolysaccharide and phorbol myristate acetate. Interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 have been reported to influence the proliferation of cultured human fibroblasts. However, these cytokines had no significant effect on the proliferation of human keratinocytes or the SCC lines tested. Although it seems unlikely that interleukin-1 or interleukin-6 could directly influence keratinocyte proliferation in vivo, the capacity of these cells to synthesize and release these cytokines supports earlier observations that keratinocytes may play an important role in augmenting an immune or inflammatory response.

+ View Abstract

The Journal of investigative dermatology, 96, 0022-202X, 771-6, 1991

PMID: 2022885


Open Access

Structural studies of acidic polymers produced by the O23 reference strain of Serratia marcescens: presence of amide-linked glutamic acid.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

The major fraction of an acidic galactoglucomannan present in lipopolysaccharide extracts from cell walls of the O23 reference strain of Serratia marcescens has the tetrasaccharide repeating-unit shown. In a minor fraction, L-glutamic acid was amide-linked to about half of the D-glucuronic acid residues. The possible contributions of the acidic polymers and a neutral polymer produced by the organism to cross-reactions with other serogroups are discussed.

+ View Abstract

Carbohydrate research, 204, 0008-6215, 85-91, 1990

PMID: 1980630


CD4+ T-cell clones from autoimmune thyroid tissue cannot be classified according to their lymphokine production.
Grubeck-Loebenstein B, Turner M, Pirich K, Kassal H, Londei M, Waldhäusl W, Feldmann M

In order to define whether CD4+ T cells from autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroid tissue could be classified according to their mediator production, lymphokine production was studied in 63 thyroid-derived CD4+ T-cell clones from four patients with Graves' disease, one with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and one with non-toxic goitre (9-12 clones per patient). The production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), lymphotoxin (LT), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) was assessed at the mRNA level by slot-blot analysis in unstimulated clones as well as after activation with monoclonal anti-CD3 (OKT3) and IL-2. No lymphokine production was found in unstimulated clones, whereas 56% of the clones produced all six lymphokines simultaneously after stimulation. In the remaining 44% usually not more than one lymphokine was missing from the complete panel. Lymphokine mRNA concentrations varied between different clones and different patients, but, in this small sample, not between the diseases from which the clones were originated. There was a significant correlation between IL-6, LT, and IL-2 mRNA levels and T-cell helper function, which was estimated by the stimulation of thyroid microsomal autoantibody production using autologous peripheral B cells. TGF-beta and IFN-gamma mRNA expression was unrelated to T-cell help. The results demonstrate that intrathyroid T cells from autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroid disorders cannot be classified according to their lymphokine production, unlike some results with in vitro-induced mouse T-cell clones, where two populations, Th1 and Th2, have been described. Single T cells are capable of producing a whole panel of lymphokines and thus are capable of triggering a multitude of different processes.

+ View Abstract

Scandinavian journal of immunology, 32, 0300-9475, 433-40, 1990

PMID: 1980155


Structure of a mannan isolated from the lipopolysaccharide of the reference strain (S3255) for a new serogroup of Serratia marcescens.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

Both a neutral and an acidic polymer have been isolated from a lipopolysaccharide extract of Serratia marcescens strain S3255. The neutral polymer is a linear mannan with the repeating unit shown. The same repeating unit has been described for the O-specific polymers from Escherichia coli O8 and Klebsiella O5.

+ View Abstract

Carbohydrate research, 212, 0008-6215, 213-7, 1991

PMID: 1959117


Induction of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist protein by transforming growth factor-beta.
Turner M, Chantry D, Katsikis P, Berger A, Brennan FM, Feldmann M

Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) mediates many immunosuppressive effects on immune cells and can inhibit the production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 (IL 1). However, TGF-beta 1 can stimulate the production of IL 6 and platelet-derived growth factor, indicating that TGF-beta 1 initiates complex effects on the production of cytokines. In this report we show that treatment of peripheral blood monocytes with TGF-beta 1 leads to the induction of a recently described IL 1 receptor antagonist protein (IRAP). The effect of TGF-beta 1 was both dose and time dependent. TGF-beta 1 induced de novo synthesis of IRAP, as Northern blotting experiments indicated a rapid and transient induction of the mRNA encoding IRAP. The induction of IRAP suggests a potential mechanism by which some of the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta 1 are mediated.

+ View Abstract

European journal of immunology, 21, 0014-2980, 1635-9, 1991

PMID: 1829411


Open Access

Structure of an acidic glycan present in the lipopolysaccharide extract from the reference strain for Serratia marcescens serogroup O18.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

The lipopolysaccharide extract from the cell wall of the reference strain for Serratia marcescens serogroup O18 contained, in addition to a neutral glycan characterised previously, an acidic glycan. Acidity was contributed both by D-glucuronic acid and by 4-O-[(R)-1-carboxyethyl]-D-glucose (4-O-Lac-D-Glc). By using n.m.r. spectroscopy, methylation analysis, and chemical degradations, the repeating unit of the acidic glycan was identified as a branched hexasaccharide having the structure shown; an O-acetyl group also present was not located. The glycan is believed to define the O18 serogroup, but is probably not an integral component of the lipopolysaccharide. [formula: see text].

+ View Abstract

Carbohydrate research, 215, 0008-6215, 293-301, 1991

PMID: 1794127


Monoclonal antibodies to idiotype inhibit in vitro growth of human B-cell lymphomas.
van Endert PM, Heilig B, Hämmerling GJ, Moldenhauer G

The effect of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) recognizing idiotype, IgM heavy chain, and IgD heavy chain on the in vitro DNA synthesis of five randomly selected leukemic human low-malignancy B-cell lymphomas was investigated. In three lymphomas of different histologic subtype, low concentrations of anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) MoAb completely inhibited spontaneous 3H-thymidine uptake of T-cell-- and monocyte-depleted tumor cells, whereas two other tumors were not affected. Maximal inhibition of DNA synthesis was achieved at MoAb concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 250 micrograms/mL and required crosslinking by bivalent antibody but not Fc-mediated effects. While two anti-IgM MoAbs were similarly efficient as anti-Id MoAb in inhibition of DNA synthesis, two anti-IgD MoAbs had no effect. Thus, surface IgD molecules seemed to be neither able to deliver inhibitory signals themselves nor to antagonize IgM-mediated signals when simultaneously crosslinked by anti-Id MoAb. Leukocyte differentiation antigen expression, IgM density, and IgM/IgD ratio on the surface of lymphoma cells did not distinguish between sensitive and resistant tumors. In vitro tumor cell survival was differently affected by prolonged incubation with anti-Id antibody. In a centrocytic lymphoma and an immunocytoma, but not in a chronic lymphocytic leukemia, suppression of 3H-thymidine uptake persisted after removal of MoAb and tumor cell viability decreased during prolonged incubation with anti-Id MoAb. These results suggest that direct inhibitory signaling via surface IgM may contribute to anti-Id MoAb-mediated tumor regression in certain human B-cell lymphomas.

+ View Abstract

Blood, 79, 0006-4971, 129-37, 1992

PMID: 1728304


Open Access

Structure of the 021 antigen from Serratia marcescens.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

Lipopolysaccharide was isolated from both phases of an aqueous-phenol extraction of defatted cell walls from the reference strain for Serratia marcescens serogroup 021. The product from the aqueous phase was of the R type, lacking a polymeric side-chain. The polymeric fraction of the lipopolysaccharide from the phenolic phase (the 021 antigen) had a disaccharide repeating-unit with the following structure: ----4)-alpha-D-Glcp-(1----4)-beta-D-ManpNAc-(1----.

+ View Abstract

Carbohydrate research, 212, 0008-6215, 187-92, 1991

PMID: 1720344


Structure of a glucorhamnan from the lipopolysaccharide of Serratia marcescens strain S1254.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

Carbohydrate research, 209, 0008-6215, 319-22, 1991

PMID: 1709820


Structure of the putative O23 antigen of Serratia marcescens.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

A neutral glycan containing L-rhamnose and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose is one of two polymers present in the lipopolysaccharide extract from the reference strain for Serratia marcescens serogroup O23. The glycan, which has the disaccharide repeating-unit shown, shares structural features with polymers from several other O serogroups. ----4)-alpha-L-Rhap-(1----4)-beta-D-GalpNAc-(1----.

+ View Abstract

Carbohydrate research, 196, 0008-6215, 127-31, 1990

PMID: 1693310


Structure of an acidic glycan from the reference strain for Serratia marcescens serogroup O22.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

In addition to a neutral glycan, lipopolysaccharide extracts from the reference strain for Serratia marcescens serogroup O22 contain an acidic polymer which probably defines the serogroup and is of microcapsular origin. The polymer is doubly branched with a heptasaccharide repeating unit and a galactan backbone. By means of spectroscopic and degradative studies, the structure of the repeating unit was established as that shown. [formula: see text]

+ View Abstract

Carbohydrate research, 231, 0008-6215, 237-48, 1992

PMID: 1394317


Structure of a neutral glycan from the lipopolysaccharides of reference strains for Serratia marcescens serogroups O2 and O3.
Oxley D,Wilkinson SG

Serogroups O2 and O3 of Serratia marcescens are differentiated by acidic glycans present in the aqueous phase when lipopolysaccharides are extracted from the reference strains by the aqueous-phenol method. The phenolic phases of these extracts from both strains also contain lipopolysaccharides, from which the same neutral glycan is released on milk acid hydrolysis. The neutral glycan has the disaccharide repeating-unit shown, and accounts for the cross-reactions between the two serogroups and also with serogroup O21: --> 4)-alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->4)-beta-D-ManpNAc-(1--.

+ View Abstract

FEMS microbiology letters, 78, 0378-1097, 209-12, 1992

PMID: 1283379


First cell fate decisions in early development – towards establishment of the trophoblast lineage
M Hemberger and W Dean

The Guide of Investigations of Mouse Pregnancy, , , , 2013


Simulating the Bacterial Chemotaxis Pathway at High Spatio-temporal Detail
Sewitz S and Lipkow K

We have used the Smoldyn software to create spatially detailed models of the Escherichia coli chemotaxis pathway. With it we can follow signalling reactions at high spatio-temporal resolution, observe the formation of gradients of phospho-proteins as well as total protein and analyse the effects of macromolecular crowding on signalling. It has enabled us to propose new regulatory elements of the signalling pathway, which are mediated through the dynamic localisation and activity of the CheZ phosphatase. We used the Smoldyn software to model quantitative fluorescent microscopy data and to determine diffusion coefficients and binding affinities. We can reliably gain information obtained under conditions with high levels of experimental noise. Smoldyn can accommodate various cellular architectures, and we show that cell shape becomes an integral part of the signalling process.

+ View Abstract

Current Chemical Biology, 7, 3, 214 - 223, 2013