Life Sciences Research for Lifelong Health

Publications olivia-casanueva

Title / Authors / Details Open Access Download

Epigenetic inheritance of proteostasis and ageing.
Li C, Casanueva O

Abundant evidence shows that the genome is not as static as once thought and that gene expression can be reversibly modulated by the environment. In some cases, these changes can be transmitted to the next generation even if the environment has reverted. Such transgenerational epigenetic inheritance requires that information be stored in the germline in response to exogenous stressors. One of the most elusive questions in the field of epigenetic inheritance is the identity of such inherited factor(s). Answering this question would allow us to understand how the environment can shape human populations for multiple generations and may help to explain the rapid rise in obesity and neurodegenerative diseases in modern society. It will also provide clues on how we might be able to reprogramme the epigenome to prevent transmission of detrimental phenotypes and identify individuals who might be at increased risk of disease. In this article, we aim to review recent developments in this field, focusing on research conducted mostly in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and mice, that link environmental modulators with the transgenerational inheritance of phenotypes that affect protein-folding homoeostasis and ageing.

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Essays in biochemistry, 60, 1744-1358, 191-202, 2016

PMID: 27744335

Open Access

Niche-associated activation of rac promotes the asymmetric division of Drosophila female germline stem cells.
W Lu, MO Casanueva, AP Mahowald, M Kato, D Lauterbach, EL Ferguson

Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs) reside adjacent to a cellular niche that secretes Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) ligands and anchors the GSCs through adherens junctions. The GSCs divide asymmetrically such that one daughter remains in the niche as a GSC, while the other is born away from the niche and differentiates. However, given that the BMP signal can be diffusible, it remains unclear how a local extracellular asymmetry is sufficient to result in a robust pattern of asymmetric division.

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PLoS biology, 10, 7, e1001357, 2012

PMID: 22802725
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001357

Open Access

Fitness trade-offs and environmentally induced mutation buffering in isogenic C. elegans.
MO Casanueva, A Burga, B Lehner

Mutations often have consequences that vary across individuals. Here, we show that the stimulation of a stress response can reduce mutation penetrance in Caenorhabditis elegans. Moreover, this induced mutation buffering varies across isogenic individuals because of interindividual differences in stress signaling. This variation has important consequences in wild-type animals, producing some individuals with higher stress resistance but lower reproductive fitness and other individuals with lower stress resistance and higher reproductive fitness. This may be beneficial in an unpredictable environment, acting as a "bet-hedging" strategy to diversify risk. These results illustrate how transient environmental stimuli can induce protection against mutations, how environmental responses can underlie variable mutation buffering, and how a fitness trade-off may make variation in stress signaling advantageous.

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Science (New York, N.Y.), 335, 6064, 82-5, 2012

PMID: 22174126
DOI: 10.1126/science.1213491

Open Access

Predicting mutation outcome from early stochastic variation in genetic interaction partners.
A Burga, MO Casanueva, B Lehner

Many mutations, including those that cause disease, only have a detrimental effect in a subset of individuals. The reasons for this are usually unknown, but may include additional genetic variation and environmental risk factors. However, phenotypic discordance remains even in the absence of genetic variation, for example between monozygotic twins, and incomplete penetrance of mutations is frequent in isogenic model organisms in homogeneous environments. Here we propose a model for incomplete penetrance based on genetic interaction networks. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system, we identify two compensation mechanisms that vary among individuals and influence mutation outcome. First, feedback induction of an ancestral gene duplicate differs across individuals, with high expression masking the effects of a mutation. This supports the hypothesis that redundancy is maintained in genomes to buffer stochastic developmental failure. Second, during normal embryonic development we find that there is substantial variation in the induction of molecular chaperones such as Hsp90 (DAF-21). Chaperones act as promiscuous buffers of genetic variation, and embryos with stronger induction of Hsp90 are less likely to be affected by an inherited mutation. Simultaneously quantifying the variation in these two independent responses allows the phenotypic outcome of a mutation to be more accurately predicted in individuals. Our model and methodology provide a framework for dissecting the causes of incomplete penetrance. Further, the results establish that inter-individual variation in both specific and more general buffering systems combine to determine the outcome inherited mutations in each individual.

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Nature, 480, 7376, 250-3, 2011

PMID: 22158248
DOI: 10.1038/nature10665

Neuronal signaling modulates protein homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans post-synaptic muscle cells.
SM Garcia, MO Casanueva, MC Silva, MD Amaral, RI Morimoto

Protein homeostasis maintains proper intracellular balance by promoting protein folding and clearance mechanisms while minimizing the stress caused by the accumulation of misfolded and damaged proteins. Chronic expression of aggregation-prone proteins is deleterious to the cell and has been linked to a wide range of conformational disorders. The molecular response to misfolded proteins is highly conserved and generally studied as a cell-autonomous process. Here, we provide evidence that neuronal signaling is an important modulator of protein homeostasis in post-synaptic muscle cells. In a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for enhancers of polyglutamine aggregation in muscle cells, we identified unc-30, a neuron-specific transcription factor that regulates the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We used additional sensors of protein conformational states to show that defective GABA signaling or increased acetylcholine (ACh) signaling causes a general imbalance in protein homeostasis in post-synaptic muscle cells. Moreover, exposure to GABA antagonists or ACh agonists has a similar effect, which reveals that toxins that act at the neuromuscular junction are potent modifiers of protein conformational disorders. These results demonstrate the importance of intercellular communication in intracellular homeostasis.

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Genes & development, 21, 22, 3006-16, 2007

PMID: 18006691
DOI: 10.1101/gad.1575307

Open Access

Germline stem cell number in the Drosophila ovary is regulated by redundant mechanisms that control Dpp signaling.
MO Casanueva, EL Ferguson

The available experimental data support the hypothesis that the cap cells (CpCs) at the anterior tip of the germarium form an environmental niche for germline stem cells (GSCs) of the Drosophila ovary. Each GSC undergoes an asymmetric self-renewal division that gives rise to both a GSC, which remains associated with the CpCs, and a more posterior located cystoblast (CB). The CB upregulates expression of the novel gene, bag of marbles (bam), which is necessary for germline differentiation. Decapentaplegic (Dpp), a BMP2/4 homologue, has been postulated to act as a highly localized niche signal that maintains a GSC fate solely by repressing bam transcription. Here, we further examine the role of Dpp in GSC maintenance. In contrast to the above model, we find that an enhancer trap inserted near the Dpp target gene, Daughters against Dpp (Dad), is expressed in additional somatic cells within the germarium, suggesting that Dpp protein may be distributed throughout the anterior germarium. However, Dad-lacZ expression within the germline is present only in GSCs and to a lower level in CBs, suggesting there are mechanisms that actively restrict Dpp signaling in germ cells. We demonstrate that one function of Bam is to block Dpp signaling downstream of Dpp receptor activation, thus establishing the existence of a negative feedback loop between the action of the two genes. Moreover, in females doubly mutant for bam and the ubiquitin protein ligase Smurf, the number of germ cells responsive to Dpp is greatly increased relative to the number observed in either single mutant. These data indicate that there are multiple, genetically redundant mechanisms that act within the germline to downregulate Dpp signaling in the Cb and its descendants, and raise the possibility that a Cb and its descendants must become refractory to Dpp signaling in order for germline differentiation to occur.

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Development (Cambridge, England), 131, 9, 1881-90, 2004

PMID: 15105369
DOI: 10.1242/dev.01076

Open Access

At least two receptors of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase are present at the synaptic basal lamina of Torpedo electric organ.
OI Casanueva, P Deprez, T García-Huidobro, NC Inestrosa

Asymmetric acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is anchored to the basal lamina (BL) of cholinergic synapses via its collagenic tail, yet the complement of matrix receptors involved in its attachment remains unknown. The development of a novel overlay technique has allowed us to identify two Torpedo BL components that bind asymmetric AChE: a polypeptide of approximately 140 kDa and a doublet of 195-215 kDa. These were found to stain metachromatically with Coomassie blue R-250, were solubilized by acetic acid, and were sensitive to collagenase treatment. Upon sequence analysis, the 140 kDa polypeptide yielded a characteristic collagenous motif. Another AChE-binding BL constituent, identified by overlay, corresponded to a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Lastly, we established that this proteoglycan, but not the collagenous proteins, interacted with at least one heparin binding domain of the collagenic tail of AChE. Our results indicate that at least two BL receptors are likely to exist for asymmetric AChE in Torpedo electric organ.

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Biochemical and biophysical research communications, 250, 2, 312-7, 1998

PMID: 9753626
DOI: 10.1006/bbrc.1998.9303

A major portion of synaptic basal lamina acetylcholinesterase is detached by high salt- and heparin-containing buffers from rat diaphragm muscle and Torpedo electric organ.
Casanueva OI, García-Huidobro T, Campos EO, Aldunate R, Garrido J, Inestrosa NC

Collagen-tailed asymmetric acetylcholinesterase (AChE) forms are believed to be anchored to the synaptic basal lamina via electrostatic interactions involving proteoglycans. However, it was recently found that in avian and rat muscles, high ionic strength or polyanionic buffers could not detach AChE from cell-surface clusters and that these buffers solubilized intracellular non-junctional asymmetric AChE rather than synaptic forms of the enzyme. In the present study, asymmetric AChE forms were specifically solubilized by ionic buffers from synaptic basal lamina-enriched fractions, largely devoid of intracellular material, obtained from the electric organ of Torpedo californica and the end plate regions of rat diaphragm muscle. Furthermore, foci of AChE activity were seen to diminish in size, number, and staining intensity when the rat synaptic basal lamina-enriched preparations were treated with the extraction buffers. In the case of Torpedo, almost all the AChE activity was removed from the pure basal lamina sheets. We therefore conclude that a major portion of extracellular collagen-tailed AChE is extractable from rat and Torpedo synaptic basal lamina by high ionic strength and heparin buffers, although some non-extractable AChE activity remains associated with the junctional regions.

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The Journal of biological chemistry, 273, 0021-9258, 4258-65, 1998

PMID: 9461624

Open Access

Acetylcholinesterase accelerates assembly of amyloid-beta-peptides into Alzheimer's fibrils: possible role of the peripheral site of the enzyme.
NC Inestrosa, A Alvarez, CA Pérez, RD Moreno, M Vicente, C Linker, OI Casanueva, C Soto, J Garrido

Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important component of cholinergic synapses, colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits of Alzheimer's brain. We report here that bovine brain AChE, as well as the human and mouse recombinant enzyme, accelerates amyloid formation from wild-type A beta and a mutant A beta peptide, which alone produces few amyloid-like fibrils. The action of AChE was independent of the subunit array of the enzyme, was not affected by edrophonium, an active site inhibitor, but it was affected by propidium, a peripheral anionic binding site ligand. Butyrylcholinesterase, an enzyme that lacks the peripheral site, did not affect amyloid formation. Furthermore, AChE is a potent amyloid-promoting factor when compared with other A beta-associated proteins. Thus, in addition to its role in cholinergic synapses, AChE may function by accelerating A beta formation and could play a role during amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's brain.

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Neuron, 16, 4, 881-91, 1996

PMID: 8608006

Open Access