Life Sciences Research for Lifelong Health

Babraham celebrates success

The Babraham Institute’s 2015 Knowledge Exchange and Commercialisation (KEC) and Public Engagement (PE) Prizes were awarded during an internal symposium on 23rd and 24th April. The KEC Prize recognises an individual or team who have contributed to the Institute's KEC activities, demonstrating passion for generating impact and transferring their knowledge, whilst the PE prize recognises contribution to the Institute's public engagement and science communication activities, demonstrating passion for science and enthusiasm and commitment to inspiring generations. 


This year’s KEC winner is Nelly Olova, a Post-Doc in the Institute’s Epigenetics research programme.

Having secured KEC funding in 2013 and 2014, Nelly is developing two antibodies with a novel specificity to epigenetic targets, as well as a method with potential for very wide usage and high socioeconomic impact. She has engaged with a number of other organisations to develop the project, and has secured a place on the University of Cambridge Judge Business School’s Accelerate Cambridge programme.

Speaking about the prize, Nelly said "My translational work has been both exciting and challenging, and would not have been possible without the KEC funding I have been awarded by the BI. I have learned a lot, made a lot of contacts, and I hope to see this project continue its journey to make a real impact to the scientific and biotech community”. 
Find out more about the KEC prize.

The PE Prize was won jointly by Claire Harwell and Simon Rudge (pictured below), both in the Signalling Programme.


Claire, a PhD student in the Coleman Lab was recognised for her enthusiasm and dedication to engaging a wide variety of audiences. Even before joining Babraham as a summer student in 2012 she published a Science in Society Review in the Cambridge Triple Helix journal on ‘locked-in syndrome’. Since joining the Institute as a PhD student in 2013 she has engaged in a wide range of science communication activities, including tireless work for Alzheimer’s Research UK (ARUK), Cambridge Science Festival, schools and undergraduate supervisions. 
 
Dr Simon Rudge, a Senior Researcher in the Wakelam Lab was also acknowledged in recognition of his efforts in setting up the Babraham Institute’s Protein Challenge project for and with the University Technical College Cambridge. Simon has been instrumental in converting a one-day outreach activity into an 8 week challenge project for 14-16 year old students and dedicated a significant proportion of his time to ensure that the project was delivered successfully.

Both judging panels included members of the BBSRC.  They praised all entrants; with one commenting “It is extremely pleasing to see so many high-quality applications, which is a reflection of the further development, appreciation and understanding of KEC [and PE] at Babraham.”

More details on the PE prize can be found here.

Congratulations to all our winners.  For more details on our PE and KEC activities see Public Engagement and Knowledge Exchange and Commercialisation pages.


Posted

1 May, 2015